How to Find an Online Writing Community: 7 Awesome Writing Sites

A lot of people believe writing is a solitary act, but having a community is important to the writing and editing process. Other readers and writers help develop work and move it forward, and just being able to talk about the writing process with others can help create new work. Many of these communities exist online and offer collections of resources for both students and educators to be accessed remotely. Take a look at the list below to find a place for your writing to thrive.

Find an Online Writing Community

  1. Power Poetry. Since you're already visiting, start with us! Power Poetry offers resources for both student writers and teachers in our "Resources" tab. We have articles on styles, authors, topics, and more. For teachers, we have free courses, lesson plans, and most importantly, a way to create digital groups that help take learning beyond the classroom. Even if you're brand new to poetry, we have something to offer you.
  2. Poets.orgPoets.org has a wide range of resources for writers at every stage of their career. They have resources for teachers, including poems for different age ranges and lesson plans for specific works. Their "Poetry Near You" tab lets you search for events by zip code, and includes both live and digital events so you can find a community that suits your needs. Poets.org also has a job board, which offers opportunities ranging from book formatting, to teaching, to bookshop attendants.
  3. Gotham Writers. Gotham Writers offers a unique array of actual classes in all writing disciplines. While their full-length courses cost a fee, they offer free one-day options and write-ins for authors looking to work on a piece in person. These in-person options are in New York City, but Gotham also has online classes and write-ins for people located outside the city. Their resource lists include articles written by their experienced faculty, author Q & A's, and an "Ask a Writer" series where authors answer questions about the writing process.
  4. Blue Stoop. Blue Stoop is a Philadelphia-based and writer-run organization offering resources and events for both emerging and established writers. Like Gotham, they offer formal classes for a fee, in addition to many free resources. Locally, Blue Stoop holds workshops, reading, and happy hours, some of which are broadcast online. Their readings and happy hours are always free if you are able to get to them in person. Blue Stoop also partners with another great resource, Literary Philly.
  5. Literary Philly. Literary Philly is a site full of curated resources for writers. While their events and education opportunities center around Philadelphia, their online events are accessible to everyone, and almost always free. Their resources include lists of lit mags, conferences, and writers collectives among many other things. It is a great site to find new communities and resources to explore online.
  6. Poetry Foundation. An extension of Poetry magazine, Poetry Foundation is a non-profit organization with a huge number of free resources. With one of the largest free poetry libraries online, it's easy to read a new author every day if you want to. Their "Learn" tab has resources for kids, teens, adults, and educators. For more resources, their "Listen" tab includes podcasts, author interviews, and poems read aloud. Poetry Foundation also holds events. Their in-person events are often in New York, but their online readings and lectures are accessible from everywhere.
  7. Scribophile. If you have trouble finding writing groups near you, Scribophile provides an online option to connect with other authors. The site offers a range of educational and social resources, including opportunities to offer and receive peer review. While they have a premium option, their free accounts have everything you need to workshop a short work with other real writers.

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