Dyslexia

Location

Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.Elementary school failed me. I appeared smart, looked smart, talked smart and was surrounded by smart friends.  The only thing that separated me from all the other kids was my speech impediment. I was unable to pronounce words with “R”, I was bullied. And thus the failure began. My mom put me into speech classes and a few months later the teacher insisted that I did not need them and I would grow out of it. I never did. I stammered over words reading aloud in class and the teacher would say “who can help Sabrina”? By the second grade I avoided using all words with “R”. The older I got, the more the differences showed between me and my classmates. In third grade, I was still reading at a first grade level, but my teachers just passed me because I was a “nice kid”. My writing could barely be understood; half of it was backwards. My classmates thought I was the last one to finish a test because I wasn’t smart, but I was. I knew what was going on and how to do it, but from the paper, to the eyes, to the mind something changed and from the mind, to the hand, to the paper; everything flipped. A battle is defined as a physical struggle; my battle was in my mind. I spent hours a night on homework, fighting with my mom telling her I couldn’t do it; she never understood. By end of fourth grade, I was failing. The school informed my mom that I should be tested for a learning disability.
            It “only” took five years, they discovered I have dyslexia. This is when I discovered that kids can be cruel. I lost many of my friends because I was in “special classes”. I was bullied more than before; friends that once stood up for me were gone. I became the odd student that had to leave class to learn what everyone else already mastered. I became silent in class. I could tell that everyone’s expectations of me were low. I wanted to change that; I wanted to make myself better so that I wasn’t just the “slow kid” in class that everyone picked on.
            In high school, I was placed in many remedial classes, but I didn’t let it get to me; I had a goal. Those who fight against dyslexia can understand the dedication it takes. I knew I had to overcome obstacles; I pushed myself harder than anyone else to get myself out of those “core” classes, and I succeeded. By the middle of 8th grade, I was in all mainstream classes and started making friends. I still struggle with my learning disability every day, but the fight becomes easier the more determined I get.
            Today, I can be proud of my GPA because it improves each year, which keeps me motivated for success. I choreograph my school musical, play varsity volleyball, am a member on my school kickline team and completed my first AP class last year. I always raise my hand in class and have more friends than I could have ever imagined. People see me as an equal. I’m not a genius or valedictorian, but I rose above other expectations.
            Last year I gave a speech in my public speaking class about my dyslexia, my fight against it and what it’s like to read with dyslexia. I stuttered and had to slow down at times, but I was brave enough to get up and tell them my struggles and how I overcome them with no fear. After, many people came up to me and said they had no idea, “you don’t seem like someone with dyslexia”. I saw high school as my chance to push myself, rise above expectations. Not only did I surprise people but I showed myself and proved to others what I am truly capable of.-vvv

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